Common Issues That We Can Treat

If you are experiencing any of these issues, our team of highly trained osteopaths can help you with a specially designed treatment plan so that you are able to get back onto the right path and find comfort again. 

Back and Neck Pain

The most common issues that we treat at our clinic include back and neck pain. Studies have shown that in this lifetime, 51% of people will suffer from neck pain and 65.1% will suffer from low back pain. In addition, within a 12 month period, 39.8% of us will suffer from neck pain and 47% will suffer from low back pain (Minghelli, 2020).

 

This type of pain can be caused by poor posture, tension, injury, and wear and tear within the body. A lack of strength and stability are usually associated with this kind of pain or tension and all our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue.

 

Our osteopaths may use a combination of exercise prescription and manual therapy including physical manipulation of the cervical, thoracic, lumbar or pelvic regions of the vertebral column. This treatment style has been proven to be an effective way in improving patient’s pain levels. (Geisser, Wiggert, Haig & Colwell, 2005) Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Geisser, M., Wiggert, E., Haig, A., & Colwell, M. (2005). A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Manual Therapy and Specific Adjuvant Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain. The Clinical Journal Of Pain, 21(6), 463-470. doi: 10.1097/01.ajp.0000135237.89834.23

Minghelli, B. (2020). Musculoskeletal spine pain in adolescents: Epidemiology of non-specific neck and low back pain and risk factors. Journal Of Orthopaedic Science, 25(5), 776-780. doi: 10.1016/j.jos.2019.10.008

Upper Back Massage
Chiropractic Treatment

Joint Pain/Osteoarthritis

Joint pain can be caused by injuries, such as strains and sprains, overuse of a joint and health conditions such as arthritis. The clinical symptoms of an osteoarthritic joint can include joint stiffness, pain and dysfunction. (Kean, Kean & Buchanan, 2004) The most commonly affected joints involve the hand, knee, hip and spine. Chronic joint pain can impact on your activities of daily living and even your ability to work. Osteopathy can release muscle tension around the affected joints which can improve the range of motion and reduce pain (Cao, 2017).

 

Our osteopaths can also support you through a graded exercise program which has been shown to be an effective way to improve function, decreased pain, reduced reliance on pain killers and may reduce the need to take sick days (Skou & Roos, 2017). Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Kean, W., Kean, R., & Buchanan, W. (2004). Osteoarthritis: symptoms, signs and source of pain. Inflammopharmacology, 12(1), 3-31. doi: 10.1163/156856004773121347

Skou, S., & Roos, E. (2017). Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D™): evidence-based education and supervised neuromuscular exercise delivered by certified physiotherapists nationwide. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1). doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1439-y

Hip Pain

Hip pain is a common type of health issue seen by our osteopaths. Hip pain can be caused by an injury, lower back problems, strained muscles, pinched nerves and more. Common hip conditions include: femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), osteoarthritis, capsular laxity, labral tears, greater trochanteric bursitis, iliopsoas tendinosis and gluteal tendon injuries (Tibor & Sekiya, 2008).  

 

Our osteopaths can treat hip pain by combining physical manipulation, dry needling, prescribing a tailored exercises program and combing load/activity modification. Studies have shown that exercise programs such as the LEAP trial and GLA:D can be effective in treating common hip complaints (Skou & Roos, 2017). (Mellor et al., 2016).

 

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Mellor, R., Grimaldi, A., Wajswelner, H., Hodges, P., Abbott, J., Bennell, K., & Vicenzino, B. (2016). Exercise and load modification versus corticosteroid injection versus ‘wait and see’ for persistent gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy (the LEAP trial): a protocol for a randomised clinical trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 17(1). doi: 10.1186/s12891-016-1043-6

Skou, S., & Roos, E. (2017). Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D™): evidence-based education and supervised neuromuscular exercise delivered by certified physiotherapists nationwide. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1). doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1439-y

 

Tibor, L., & Sekiya, J. (2008). Differential Diagnosis of Pain Around the Hip Joint. Arthroscopy: The Journal Of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery, 24(12), 1407-1421. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2008.06.019

Physical Therapist
Leg Injury

Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common problem and is caused by injury which can damage different parts of the knee such as the bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and muscles.  Risk factors for knee pain include having had a previous injury, strenuous occupation, having weak or tight leg muscles and/or being overweight (Miranda, Viikari-Juntura, Martikainen & Riihimäki, 2002). When treating the knee, your osteopath will take global approach to treatment by integrating both the function of the hip and the foot. This is because research has found that a decrease in hip strength has been shown to be a contributing factor to knee pain (Thomson, Krouwel, Kuisma & Hebron, 2016). All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Miranda, H., Viikari-Juntura, E., Martikainen, R., & Riihimäki, H. (2002). A prospective study on knee pain and its risk factors. Osteoarthritis And Cartilage, 10(8), 623-630. doi: 10.1053/joca.2002.0796

Thomson, C., Krouwel, O., Kuisma, R., & Hebron, C. (2016). The outcome of hip exercise in patellofemoral pain: A systematic review. Manual Therapy, 26, 1-30. doi: 10.1016/j.math.2016.06.003

Headaches and Migraines 

Headaches and migraines can be debilitating and can impact on your quality of life. As there are different types of headaches and migraines, it is important you get a diagnosis from a medical practitioner.  Along with stress, fatigue, dehydration, and other causes, common causes for headaches can be poor posture and excessive muscle contraction such as frowning and jaw clenching (Mogilicherla, Mamindla & Enumula, 2020).

 

Osteopaths can assist in managing headaches by releasing muscles and improving the mobility of joints and prescribing exercises to assist you in managing reoccurrences on your own (Racicki, Gerwin, DiClaudio, Reinmann & Donaldson, 2013). Our osteopaths will also take the time to identify the causative factors of your headaches to promote more long lasting relief.

 

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Mogilicherla, S., Mamindla, P., & Enumula, D. (2020). A review on classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and pharmacotherapy of headache. Innovare Journal Of Medical Sciences, 1-12. doi: 10.22159/ijms.2020.v8i6.37667

Racicki, S., Gerwin, S., DiClaudio, S., Reinmann, S., & Donaldson, M. (2013). Conservative physical therapy management for the treatment of cervicogenic headache: a systematic review. Journal Of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 21(2), 113-124. doi: 10.1179/2042618612y.0000000025

Head Massage

Postural Problems

Modern life such as working long hours at a desk and living through lockdown after lockdown due to a pandemic can impact on the quality of your posture. In some cases people can be born with a genetic condition that can affect the shape of the spine which can influence posture. Having poor posture can cause health issues such as neck and back pain, headaches and a lack of energy. 

 

At Box Hill Osteopathy we offer a free 15 minute movement and posture assessment. This assessment is a good opportunity if you have questions you wish to ask before you book in for  treatment or you are not sure what osteopathy can do for you. Book an appointment today!

Reference:

Yip, C., Chiu, T., & Poon, A. (2008). The relationship between head posture and severity and disability of patients with neck pain. Manual Therapy, 13(2), 148-154. doi: 10.1016/j.math.2006.11.002

 
 
 
 
 
 

Sports and Exercise Injuries

Sports and exercise injuries are sprains, strains and physical traumas that occur commonly from every day exercise right up to professional sport. A study found that adults and children had an approximately 20% chance on attaining a sports injury within a one year period (Bueno et al., 2018).  Osteopathy may assist in aiding the recovery of your sports and exercise injuries.

 

Treatment techniques include physical manipulation, dry needling, taping and prescribed exercises. All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with injuries and will work to tailor a custom treatment plan to get you doing what you love and back performing to your best. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Bueno, A., Pilgaard, M., Hulme, A., Forsberg, P., Ramskov, D., Damsted, C., & Nielsen, R. (2018). Injury prevalence across sports: a descriptive analysis on a representative sample of the Danish population. Injury Epidemiology, 5(1). doi: 10.1186/s40621-018-0136-0

Dhillon, M., Dhillon, H., & Dhilllon, S. (2017). Current concepts in sports injury rehabilitation. Indian Journal Of Orthopaedics, 51(5), 529. doi: 10.4103/ortho.ijortho_226_17

Physiotherapist
Reflexology Therapy

 Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis describes inflammation of the plantar fascia, a piece of strong, thick tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot. One of the most common symptoms of plantar fasciitis is noticeable pain in the heel with the initial steps after prolonged inactivity (McPoil et al., 2008).  

 

Common causes of this condition are sports that put stress on the heel bone, being flat-footed or having high arches, pregnancy, being overweight and having tight calf muscles to name a few. To help manage your pain, your osteopath may use a combination of mobilisation and physical therapy techniques to the lower leg/foot, use inserts or night splints as well integrate a graded exercises program which has been shown to have a positive effect on pain and function (Rathleff et al., 2014).

 

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

McPoil, T., Martin, R., Cornwall, M., Wukich, D., Irrgang, J., & Godges, J. (2008). Heel Pain—Plantar Fasciitis. Journal Of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 38(4), A1-A18. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2008.0302

Rathleff, M., Mølgaard, C., Fredberg, U., Kaalund, S., Andersen, K., & Jensen, T. et al. (2014). High-load strength training improves outcome in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports, 25(3), e292-e300. doi: 10.1111/sms.12313

 
 
 

Wrist Pain and Carpel Tunnel

Carpal tunnel is a condition that is characterised by pain, weakness and/or numbness and tingling affecting the hand. The condition is thought to affect approximately 10% of the population and there is a higher prevalence for female over males (1.4:1 respectively). Risk factors of carpel tunnel include: diabetes Mellitus, Menopause, Hypothyroidism, Obesity, arthritis and pregnancy (Padua et al., 2016). 

 

To help manage your symptoms, your osteopath may integrate a combination of: load management, ergonomic advice, physical therapy, and wrist splinting. Exercises such as the median nerve glide have also shown to have positive effects to patient’s symptoms (Mohamed, Hassan, Abdel-Magied & Wageh, 2016).

 

In addition, taking a holistic approach to healthcare, your osteopath will also screen and treat your neck, shoulders and arm, as the key structures that are compromised in carpel tunnel originate from your neck.                

 

References:

Mohamed, F., Hassan, A., Abdel-Magied, R., & Wageh, R. (2016). Manual therapy intervention in the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: median nerve mobilization versus medical treatment. Egyptian Rheumatology And Rehabilitation, 43(1), 27-34. doi: 10.4103/1110-161x.177424

Padua, L., Coraci, D., Erra, C., Pazzaglia, C., Paolasso, I., & Loreti, C. et al. (2016). Carpal tunnel syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, and management. The Lancet Neurology, 15(12), 1273-1284. doi: 10.1016/s1474-4422(16)30231-9

Hand Massage

Sciatica Pain

Despite having multiple definitions, sciatica is usually defined as low back pain with numbness and tingling down the leg. Studies have shown that there is a positive prognosis for sciatica with 60% of patients recovering within 3 months and 70% within 12 months. Another study found that 50% of patients with sciatica reported improvements within 10 days of non-surgical interventions and 75% reported improvements after 4 weeks (Koes, van Tulder & Peul, 2007).

 

Following attaining your case history, your osteopaths will perform multiple clinical tests to assess your movement and function. In line with treatment guidelines, radiological imaging is ONLY performed if we suspected that there are some sinister pathology (Chou, 2011).

 

Your osteopath will then support you through your injury by providing education, advice on how to stay active, encouraging continued daily activities and providing an adequate treatment plan.

 

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Chou, R. (2011). Diagnostic Imaging for Low Back Pain: Advice for High-Value Health Care From the American College of Physicians. Annals Of Internal Medicine, 154(3), 181. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-154-3-201102010-00008

Koes, B., van Tulder, M., & Peul, W. (2007). Diagnosis and treatment of sciatica. BMJ, 334(7607), 1313-1317. doi: 10.1136/bmj.39223.428495.be

Shoulder and Arm Pain

Shoulder injuries are thought to account for approximately 15.4% of men and 24.9% of women who reported weekly episodes of pain with studies showing that those aged between 50-56 years of age and most likely to report increased pain prevalence and severity (Pribicevic, 2012).

 

Common causes of shoulder pain include: rotator cuff tear, adhesive capsulitis, sub acromial impingement, sub acromial bursitis, shoulder dislocation or referral from the cervical spine. Risk factors of shoulder pain may include: altered shoulder kinematics associated with capsular tightness, rotator cuff and scapular muscle dysfunction, overuse due to sustained intensive work or poor posture (Dunning et al., 2021).  

 

Studies have shown strong evidence for exercise rehabilitation and manual therapy for treating sub acromial shoulder pain with exercise therapy suggested as a primary treatment method due to its clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness (Pieters et al., 2020). Other modalities which have reported benefits include the use of Kinesiology tape (Kul & Ugur, 2019) and dry needling (Tejera-Falcón et al., 2017) for shoulder or upper extremity pain.

 

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

References:

Dunning, J., Butts, R., Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C., Walsh, S., Goult, C., & Gillett, B. et al. (2021). Spinal Manipulation and Electrical Dry Needling in Patients With Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal Of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 51(2), 72-81. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2021.9785

Kul, A., & Ugur, M. (2019). Comparison of the Efficacy of Conventional Physical Therapy Modalities and Kinesio Taping Treatments in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome. The Eurasian Journal Of Medicine, 51(2), 138-143. doi: 10.5152/eurasianjmed.2018.17421

Pieters, L., Lewis, J., Kuppens, K., Jochems, J., Bruijstens, T., Joossens, L., & Struyf, F. (2020). An Update of Systematic Reviews Examining the Effectiveness of Conservative Physical Therapy

Interventions for Subacromial Shoulder Pain. Journal Of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 50(3), 131-141. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2020.8498

Pribicevic, M. (2012). The Epidemiology of Shoulder Pain: A Narrative Review of the Literature. Pain In Perspective. doi: 10.5772/52931

Tejera-Falcón, E., Toledo-Martel, N., Sosa-Medina, F., Santana-González, F., Quintana-de la Fe, M., Gallego-Izquierdo, T., & Pecos-Martín, D. (2017). Dry needling in a manual physiotherapy and therapeutic exercise protocol for patients with chronic mechanical shoulder pain of unspecific origin: a protocol for a randomized control trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1). doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1746-3 10.1186/s12891-017-1746-3

Shoulder Treatment
 
 
 
Tennis

Tennis/Golfers Elbow

Medial epicondylitis (golfers elbow) and lateral epicondylitis (Tennis elbow) are common conditions that may occur due to overuse of the forearm tendons. The condition is characterised by pain in the forearm that may radiate into the hand, pain that worsens with activities such as gripping, throwing, forearm movements and pain that is usually relived by rest.

 

In some cases there may be some visible swelling. Studies have shown that a large majority of patients will respond well to a well-structured, non-surgical program (Ciccotti, Schwartz & Ciccotti, 2004).

 

Other effective treatments for pain include: dry needling/acupuncture to your forearm (Zhou et al., 2020), K tape to your forearm (Cho, Hsu, Lin & Lin, 2018) as well as administering a brace (Pitzer, Seidenberg & Bader, 2014).

 

Your osteopath will work and support you through your injury by trying to maintain your daily activities as well as incorporating a graded exercise program to improve your flexibility, mobility and strength through the shoulder, forearm and wrist.

 

References:

Cho, Y., Hsu, W., Lin, L., & Lin, Y. (2018). Kinesio taping reduces elbow pain during resisted wrist extension in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis: a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 19(1). doi: 10.1186/s12891-018-2118-3

Ciccotti, M., Schwartz, M., & Ciccotti, M. (2004). Diagnosis and treatment of medial epicondylitis of the elbow. Clinics In Sports Medicine, 23(4), 693-705. doi: 10.1016/j.csm.2004.04.011

pitzer, M., Seidenberg, P., & Bader, D. (2014). Elbow Tendinopathy. Medical Clinics Of North America, 98(4), 833-849. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2014.04.002

Zhou, Y., Guo, Y., Zhou, R., Wu, P., Liang, F., & Yang, Z. (2020). Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Pain Research And Management, 2020, 1-10. doi: 10.1155/2020/8506591 10.1155/2020/8506591

Jaw Pain

Jaw pain or temperomadibular disorders are estimated to affect up to 12% of the general population which cause 1 in 5 people to seek medical treatment. Common symptoms of jaw pain include: facial pain with jaw movements, joint or muscle tenderness, clicking or jaw locking as well as inability to fully open or close mouth.

 

Studies have found interventions such as patient education, behavioural modification, exercise rehabilitation, neuromuscular re-education and manual therapy may have positive benefits to people’s symptoms (Kraus & Prodoehl, 2017). In another osteopathic manipulative study, Facial MET, direct myofascial release and osteopathic BLT techniques to the TMJ were suggested to be able to help with symptoms of jaw pain (Nahian, ÜNAL & Jr, 2021).

All of our osteopaths are trained and experienced with this health issue and are able to design a custom treatment plan to assist you in managing this type of pain. Additionally, our osteopaths are able to work collaboratively with your other healthcare providers to promote holistic care.

 

Reference:

Kraus, S., & Prodoehl, J. (2017). Outcomes and patient satisfaction following individualized physical therapy treatment for patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disc displacement without reduction with limited opening: A cross-sectional study. CRANIO®, 37(1), 20-27. doi: 10.1080/08869634.2017.1379260  

Nahian, A., ÜNAL, M., & Jr, J. (2021). Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment: Facial Muscle Energy, Direct MFR, and BLT Procedure – for TMJ Dysfunction. Retrieved 8 September 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK564310/

.

Model's Lower Face
Bare Feet

Ankle Pain

Ankle injuries account for the most common type of sports injury (30%) (Waterman, Owens, Davey, Zacchilli & Belmont, 2010). Signs and symptoms may include: pain, swelling, tenderness, bruising, instability or restricted range of motion through the ankle.

 

Studies have shown that up to 74% of individuals who experience an ankle sprain will have residual symptoms up to seven years later including instability, ankle giving way or mechanical instability (Anandacoomarasamy, 2005) and up to 72% of the patients being unable to maintain their previous physical activity levels (Konradsen, Bech, Ehrenbjerg & Nickelsen, 2002).

 

Therefore as the research suggests, treatment and rehabilitation for an ankle sprain is vital for long term health.

 

Your osteopath will support you through your injury by providing manual therapy to release tension through your ankle, increase the range of motion available at the ankle as well as providing education and activity modification to keep you moving.

 

Bracing and balance exercises may also be utilized in treatment as research has shown its importance in reducing reinjury rates (Bellows & Wong, 2018).     

 

References:

Al Adal, S., Pourkazemi, F., Mackey, M., & Hiller, C. (2019). The Prevalence of Pain in People With Chronic Ankle Instability: A Systematic Review. Journal Of Athletic Training, 54(6), 662-670. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-531-17

Anandacoomarasamy, A. (2005). Long term outcomes of inversion ankle injuries * Commentary. British Journal Of Sports Medicine, 39(3), e14-e14. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2004.011676

Konradsen, L., Bech, L., Ehrenbjerg, M., & Nickelsen, T. (2002). Seven years follow-up after ankle inversion trauma. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports, 12(3), 129-135. doi: 10.1034/j.1600-0838.2002.02104.x

Bellows, R., & Wong, C. (2018). The effect of bracing and balance training on ankle sprain incidence among athletes: a systematic review with meta-analysis. International Journal Of Sports Physical Therapy, 13(3), 379-388. doi: 10.26603/ijspt20180379

Waterman, B., Owens, B., Davey, S., Zacchilli, M., & Belmont, P. (2010). The Epidemiology of Ankle Sprains in the United States. Journal Of Bone And Joint Surgery, 92(13), 2279-2284.doi: 10.2106/jbjs.i.015 10.2106/jbjs.i.01537